Bookworm buyer

Brooke Barrett found the right home for her lifestyle, beside her “own private little library,” in Marda Loop

After renting a small condo in a boutique building in Bankview for six years, Brooke Barrett was ready to take the plunge into homeownership. As a lawyer, she works long hours and wanted to find a maintenance-free home, close to a bevy of walkable amenities, including a library. Staying in the inner-city was also top of mind. She checked out townhomes and condos in Kensington and West Hillhurst, and considered the East Village, but in the end, she decided to make Marda Loop home, purchasing a new condo in the heart of the action on 33rd Avenue.

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The flow of history

Calgary’s rivers have shaped the city’s development since its inception

In 1875, members of the North West Mounted Police built a fort at the confluence of the Bow and Elbow Rivers.

Fort Calgary quickly attracted early settlers to the area, and a thriving little community started to grow – one that never strayed far from the rivers that would shape its development.

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Making a mark

Battistella Developments raises the bar for architectural design in the Calgary condo market

Battistella Developments’ condo highrises are marked by explosive colour and sharp artistry, boldly standing in several trendy neighbourhoods across Calgary’s urban core.

Their names – and striking architecture – have become iconic: Orange, Chocolate, Chartreuce, Brunette, Ink, Pixel and Colours.

The goal is to bring something unique to the market, “every single time,” said Chris Pollen, Battistella’s director of sales and marketing.

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Inward growth

City continues process of intensification, as communities adjust to higher-density living

For a long time, news stories about development in Calgary tended to paint a picture of a city growing out of control, with headlines like “Calgary battles urban sprawl” or “Calgary versus the car: the city that declared war on urban sprawl.”

Rylan Graham, an instructor in the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design, says after the Second World War, much of the population growth in cities occurred on the urban-rural fringe.

“This is the form of growth that is often connected with the term urban sprawl,” he said. “Generally, planning has come to recognize the ills of urban sprawl – that it is unsustainable socially, economically and environmentally.”

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