Artesia at Heritage Pointe. Courtesy Brookfield Residential
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A pretty hamlet to the south of Calgary, Heritage Pointe offers the beauty and serenity of country living just minutes from the action of the big city.

The master-planned community graces 344 hectares just north of Dunbow Road, between Deerfoot Trail and Macleod Trail S.E.

Area amenities include the Heritage Pointe Golf Club and Heritage Pointe Village Centre, an amenity hub with pubs, restaurants and a variety of services. At the same time, Calgary’s retail and gastronomic milieu is a quick, 10-minute jaunt away.

Tucked away within this amenity-rich village is Artesia, a private estate community that boasts plenty of green space. In fact, more than half of the 60-hectare community is covered by parks, water features and ponds. With more than four kilometres of paved trails – along with playing fields; tobogganing hills; tennis, pickleball and basketball courts; and two playgrounds – residents can be active all day long.

“Residents will feel like they have their own little hideaway immersed in nature, yet also feel connected to their community through the homeowners association and local amenities.” – Tiffany Ardolino, Brookfield Residential

“Artesia really offers that feeling of space and sanctuary. Residents will feel like they have their own little hideaway immersed in nature, yet also feel connected to their community through the homeowners association and local amenities,” said Tiffany Ardolino, senior manager of customer development for Artesia developer Brookfield Residential.

Large home sites (the average lot size is 65 feet wide and 140 feet deep) with ample space between homes (20 feet is common) allow for privacy and enjoyment of nature.

At final build out, there will be only 279 homes in this intimate enclave – 207 single-family estate homes and 72 villas. The hand-picked builder group includes Augusta Fine Homes, Homes by Avi and Brookfield Residential.

Innovation in environmental sustainability is at the core of Artesia’s design. The community’s energy-efficient street lights were carefully designed to reduce light pollution, in keeping with the Municipal District of Foothills Dark Sky initiative, while water conservation and storm management systems hover on the cutting-edge.

The community uses bioswales to collect water from rain and storm events, filtering the first flush of pollutants naturally using vegetation, sand, silt and earth. The water is then used to irrigate all the common areas and home sites.

“But the main environmental initiative may just be leaving nature alone and letting residents enjoy the abundant green spaces,” said Ardolino.