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If you are a homeowner in Calgary, you’re probably wondering what the new cannabis legislation that takes effect Oct. 17 will mean for you.

Matt Zabloski, the City of Calgary’s project lead for the legalization of cannabis, said the federal government has set the table for what will happen in Calgary.

For example, homeowners will have the ability to grow up to four cannabis plants in their residence. Zabloski says that includes anywhere on your property, both inside and outside.

In terms of consumption, Calgarians will be able to smoke on their own private property.

“We’re treating it really the same as we do with cigarettes for example,” said Zabloski. “We don’t have any restrictions on private property. The only restrictions that we’ve put on from the City’s point of view are in areas to which the public has access … We’re not going to be enforcing if somebody’s calling and saying, ‘my neighbour’s smoking cannabis on the back deck.’ ”

“There’s nothing in our legislation that prevents condos, condo boards or apartment landlords from further restricting it, and I’ve heard that most certainly, in a lot of cases, they have.” – Matt Zabloski, City of Calgary project lead for the legalization of cannabis

But not everything is that cut and dried. There are other rules that could apply to people who live in condos, for example. Zabloski says a condo board could create its own restrictions on cannabis cultivation and use.

“There’s nothing in our legislation that prevents condos, condo boards or apartment landlords from further restricting it, and I’ve heard that most certainly, in a lot of cases, they have,” he said.

In fact, Boardwalk, one of the largest apartment rental companies in Canada, confirmed recently it is banning smoking, eating or growing cannabis in all its properties across the province.

Zabloski said he expects the majority of condo and apartment landlords will not allow smoking on site, but that decision will be made on a case-by-case basis.

There’s also another issue that could crop up.

“We encourage you to talk to your landlord about edible cannabis products. Although edible cannabis products such as brownies and cookies cannot be legally sold until further federal and provincial regulations, edible cannabis products may be made at home,” reads the City’s website.

“If you live in a rental unit or condo, you might consider discussing with your landlord or condo board whether rules would allow for edibles to be made in your building.”

Zabloski says the City will continue to monitor its legislation in the coming weeks, months and years to make sure it’s appropriate, and if it needs amendments, the City is open to revisiting the issue.