Coming Home to Okotoks

With a population that has more than doubled since 2001, the Town of Okotoks with its rolling foothills and mountain views is a great place to call home.

“Growing up in Okotoks was great. It was amazing to see the way the town has changed in the last two decades, not only in population but (also) in terms of amenities,” said Katie Turner, who called Okotoks home for 17 years. “Through things like street hockey and block parties, we knew almost every neighbour on my street, and those people have remained close family friends for years. Having that sense of community was so important growing up.”

As well as maintaining a sense of community, the town has managed to keep in touch with its historical roots with Olde Towne Okotoks bringing together Elizabeth, Elma and McRae Streets as well as North Railway. Olde Towne also highlights Okotoks cultural scene including the Okotoks Art Gallery and the Okotoks Museum & Archives. While holding on to a sense of history, the town also offers up big city amenities including several restaurants, a Wal-Mart and Home Depot.

In 1998, the town estimated a buildout population of between 25,000 and 30,000 people. With the population reaching 24,962 in 2012, the population cap was revisited and lifted.

“Okotoks Town Council looks forward to working with administration and the public to develop our plans for future development in Okotoks,” said Mayor Bill Robertson. “We will remain a leader in sustainability, and manage growth in ways that retain our friendly, caring and safe community.”

Sustainability is something Okotoks keeps as a top priority. The Okotoks community of Drake Landing was the first of its kind in North America. The community is heated by a system designed to store solar energy during the summer months, which is then distributed to each home during the winter months. The community earned the Energy Globe Award in November 2011 for utilizing state of the art heating technology.

In 2012, 585 homes were sold in Okotoks, a 12 per cent increase over 2011’s numbers. The single-family annual average benchmark price was $367,550 in 2012, an increase of five per cent compared to 2011 and four per cent lower than the peak.

“As in Calgary, improving demand in Okotoks, combined with declining new listings, moved the town’s market into balanced conditions,” said CREB®’s Towns Quarterly Report for the fourth quarter of 2012.

This February alone, Okotoks saw 37 sales for an average sales price of $392,612.

CREB® Town & Country Residential Statistics – February 2013

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