Alberta’s Oasis

Chestermere and Langdon provide open spaces, affordability and more

Sitting just on Calgary’s eastern border, it’s easy to understand the appeal offered by
Chestermere and the surrounding area.

With the cost of owning a home in Calgary on the rise, the town provides homebuyers with an affordable option within a 10-minute drive of Alberta’s largest city.

“It was important that we were able to get more for our money in Chestermere, it did sway our search from areas in Calgary,” said Dominique Durocher, who moved to the town a year ago.

Through the first three months of 2013, the benchmark price of an average home in Chestermere sits at $455,900, compared to $490,600 in Calgary. Proof of how attractive affordability is in the town, year-to-date sales number 91 this year compared to 54 during the same period of 2013, an increase of 69 per cent. Alberta’s fastest growing medium-sized community, Chestermere’s population grew by nearly 20 per cent between 2006 and 2012.

Rather than simply providing an inexpensive alternative to big city living, the Chestermere area captures much of what’s so enjoyable about living in Southern Alberta, with one important addition. While boasting many opportunities for outdoor pursuits, the Calgary area isn’t known for its abundance of lakes.

Providing an option for aquatic activities just minutes from city limits, Chestermere’s 4.8 kilometre long lake allows area residents to enjoy boating, fishing, swimming and even paddle boarding.

Along with activities on the lake, residents can also enjoy the lake lifestyle while on dry land. Several lakeside parks around the town mean a picnic is always just a moment away.

Part of a larger redevelopment that will include a 60 per cent expansion of the town’s Anniversary Park, the 1,920 square metre beach will feature steps leading into the lake alongside a promenade plaza with grassy areas for sunbathers, picnic areas and beach lounge chairs.

“I’m looking forward to spending time at the lake and checking out the sand beach they are building,” said Durocher.

Along with affordability and activity, Durocher’s reasons for choosing Chestermere were the short commute to the city — less than 20 minutes for most residents — as well as the unique community feel offered up by the town.

“The lifestyle is different in Chestermere. Even though it is so close to the city, it maintains the feel of a small town. It’s nice to walk around town and the pace of life just seems a bit more relaxed,” said Durocher.

“They do chats with the mayor on a monthly basis so residents can find out what is going on in the community and they take the residents wants and needs [into account] when planning for the future.”

Also bringing that same small town feel is Chestermere’s neighbour to the east. Located 15 minutes southwest of Chestermere, Langdon was thought of as the “good luck town” because in the 25 years between 1883 and 1908, there was not one death recorded.

Recalling its heritage as an early stop on the Canadian Pacific Railway in Alberta’s early days, Langdon retains that heritage with its 1908-themed main street.

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